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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
half slave and half free. >> casting nims the mold of the great civil rights leaders he avowed action on series of issue from climate change to immigration reform. became the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address. >> our journey is not complete until our wives, mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to the efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> debt and deficit front and center he offered a vigorous defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of healthcare and size of the deficit. we reject that they must choose between caring that built the country. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started his day early, with a prayer service at st. john's church. before departing the white house for the longest motorcades known to man for the rise to the capital. a star-studded affair. where else do you see paul ryan mingling with jay-z and beyonce who belted out the national anthem. >> the ceremony was over there was a stream of pomp and
i was honored to be among three civil rights leaders that i was invited with the head of the naacp and urban league, labor leaders from three organizations, showing that it is not a struggle that has yet won. we must continue to fight. it took the dr. kings, the rosa parks, to make it possible for us to have an open america. it took those that fought for gender equality and gay and l z lesbian rights and labor rights to open up america, it takes those of us now to continue to fight. we have gone through a turbulent time, we've gone through turbulent history. but we've not arrived yet. when you fly, you don't get off the plane when you get out of turbulence, you get off once you've reached your destination. until we get to the destination of this country, this nation living up to its creed, it will not be time for us to dislodge those that do what is necessary to keep this nation moving forward, both in office and those that are out of office and in the streets of this nation raising issues. that's what king day is about. that's what the victory of b arksz barack obama is a victory
, gay rights, civil rights. there was a feeling in the way he framed on that platform it felt different to her. it felt different to me. that was your reaction as well? >> it felt different to me as well. we're all sitting around whether we're journalists or not. we're listening for things. from our own experiences. so when i heard the president of the united states say stonewall after saying seneca falls and selma, sort of an electric shock went through me. whoa, the president of the united states just woef in the gay rights movement with the women's rights movement and the traditional civil rights movement, but he didn't just leave it there. that would have been box checking, but in the next paragraph he talked about our gay brothers and sisters and equal treatment under the law, and that went well beyond what i think anyone even expected a president of the united states to say in an inaugural address one of their premier platforms for the american president to not only talk to the american people, but to tack to the world. while this was a domestic address, a completely agree with th
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
and fail without controversy. understand, a lot of civil rights leaders from that era resist putting the gay rights movement within the civil rights movement. so i think when a lot of this has gone to pass, we will remember the bigness of the gay rights. >> was it a big speech? was it a partisan speech? >> well, it was both. it had elements of boat. let me agree with what cornell said. i couldn't help but notice the man who signed the defensive marriage act, bill clinton, opposed to gay marriage changed his position during the course of his presidency. >> every speech before 2004, looking for a constitution to ban gay marriage. >> i welcome it. what i didn't welcome was the most polarizing president that we had became more polarized. this was a speech for the 51% who voted for him. there wasn't much more for the 49% who did not. it was a speech that talked about collective action by the government and when you look at the biggest issue that we face of this era, it's the deficit. it's the trillion dollars of debt and the president didn't really talk about that. he talked about, we're
is the country's oldest civil rights group joining a lawsuit against the city of new york? we'll tell you, then a little bit later this hour, why some kentucky insiders are warning ashley judd away from a senate run. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ ♪ ♪ tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. as
in his inaugural, while talking about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president insisting we address climate change, and on immigration, arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our work force, rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: were there powerful performances, kelly clarkson's stirring rendition of "my country tis of thee." ♪ to thee we sing >> reporter: beyonce returning four years later, this time, to sing the national anthem. ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ >> reporter: and as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment. one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: and as the first couple made their way back to the white house,
by myrlie evers williams. the wife of the slain civil rights leader, medgar evans. >> 100 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors. >> vice president biden was sworn in by supreme court justice sonia sotomayor. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. ♪ ♪ oh beautiful >> then, james taylor's rendition of "america the beautiful." ♪ then the moment was at hand. the president swore his oath on two bibles. one was abraham lincoln's, the other dr. martin luther king junior's. >> protect and defend -- >> the constitution of the united states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> and unlike four years ago, chief justice roberts and the president made it through, using the correct wording. ♪ >> barack h. obama! >> and then came the president's second inaugural address. >> this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun
presidents? >> the temptation is to say yes, although we are listening to several civil rights activists today saying it's not as polarized as when we were watching the march on washington. i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislatively strike while the iron is hot. and all presidents re-elected to a second term, it's right now, the first year of their second term. remember, the six-year itch, when you get to the third cycle of the congressional elections, 2014, generally the minority, the house of republicans are expected to gain seats because there's this six-year itch. the time to pass legs. is in the next two years and really this year. >> i will jump in and say there's so many x factors out there right now, the arab spring, i think we think is a good thing right now, we don't know. we don't know what's going to han in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> and in a year or two we were talking about al qaeda being decimated and now we're seeing nigeria and mali. >> right, i think his attention is g
to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights demonstrators fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn, often thought of the birthplace of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments, whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara falls or these things
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
are listening to several civil rights activists today saying it's not as polarized as when we were watching the march on washington. i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislatively strike while the iron is hot. and all presidents re-elected to a second term, it's right now, the first year of their second term. remember, the six-year itch, when you get to the third cycle of the congressional elections, 2014, generally the minority, the house of republicans are expected to gain seats because there's this six-year itch. the time to pass legs. is in the next two years and really this year. >> i will jump in and say there's so many x factors out there right now, the arab spring, i think we think is a good thing right now, we don't know. we don't know what's going to han in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> and in a year or two we were talking about al qaeda being decimated and now we're seeing nigeria and mali. >> right, i think his attention is going to be torn back to the middle east. it just will. my pr
, the pressing need to combat climate change, the notion that gay rights is a civil right, but at the ends of the day it was a huge proposal for america, the road ahead. and my question to myself was what would mitt romney's speech have sounded like? what is the big vision for america from the republican party other than cutting the deficit? other than tackling debt? i don't think we've heard anything articulated on the level that the president did today and certainly in recent months from the right. and so in that way, you know, much respect to the chairman, we are friends and i respect his opinion, but i have not heard anything from the right that would counter the notion that the party is very much -- >> michael needs -- >> but my point isn't on policy. yeah, we're going to disagree -- the president laid out a collectivist agenda today and that's very clear. sgroo a collectivist agenda. >> yeah, where he said the individual can't succeed without the collective and that's just not true in the view of a lot of republicans. but that's not my point. my point was speaking to what howard was
nominated an anti-civil rights candidate in 1964 barry goldwater, and since then has not cracked 20% with the black vote. i'm wondering if just now finally after all these years maybe getting on board with an immigration reform policy do you think that gets you anywhere where you are right now with the latino vote or did that ship sail? >> you know i hope that it does. i'd have to tell you, actions -- i think people are waiting to see what we do. and my hope is that we are going to meet the expectations that people have of us. that this is a problem that we will solve. the american people are interested in solutions. they are just -- they're so tired and as am i of this kicking the can down the road and not having adult conversations if you will about some of these issues whether it's immigration, whether it is the out of control federal spending, whether it is the escalating rate of debt in this country. whether it is the fact that we have a health care system that is going to have to have some attention. and the immigration issue will become linked to the
holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader. now, when the president takes the oeath of office, he's going to use a bible that belonged to dr. king. the president and vice president joe biden honored the nation's fallen soldiers today as well during a wreath laying ceremony at arlington national cemetery. it took place shortly after the vice president was sworn in. >> this is the president aes day and the president's moment in the spotlight but when the ceremony is done, all the parties, mr. obama will still have to deal with the republican led house of representatives, divided government in washington. sharon peter king of new york, the congressman with the best last name in congress, is with us this evening. mr. chairman, it's good to see you. as a republican and a member of a republican caucus that has had its own internal nights in recent days, what can the president do? he's a democrat. you know the partisanship. what can he do to hit a reset button. >> the partisanship is there. from the president's perspective, i think he should not be, i don't know if arrogant is the right
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
history. the pioneers went over the rocky mountains. we got through world war ii. we did the civil rights movement. they did it, not we. i mean we that's the whole point. the civil rights movement the gay rights movement the womens movement came from below and leaders responded. it's never coming from the top down. usually change comes from the bottom up. that's where the we is. >> lincoln's second inaugural address was something like 701 words or something. i believe he used the word "i" once in the speech. so could a president these days give a 700-word inaugural address? please? >> we would love it. that means you have to have that poetic compression. linkeningen linkcoln was a writer that knew how to make these things little. we would have to talk more. oh my god. >> doris, let me ask you a question. i want to follow up on this but i want to make sure it's a fair thing to ask. that's the great they think about "morning joe." >> uh-oh. here he goes. >> the great thing about "morning joe" is -- >> what are you doing? >> we fly without -- >> are you thinking? >> we ign
mom to my right is mahassan and my mom to the right is my birth mother, and basically i support civil unions. nobody can't ever tell me that i can't have two mothers because i really do. >> this probably would never have happened 10 or 15 years ago, david zirin. you know that. why is it now that athletes are taking more political issues? >> on this issue in particular it's a great example because to me it's the whole real world sports world dynamic and yes, it's definitely true, the real world over here and the sports world over here, but this moat that separates the two, people are starting to build bridges and in the last five years there's been a national movement state by state for lbgt rights and for marriage equality. and athletes, as one athlete said to me, i quote him in the book. he said, look, it's not like we live on planet jock and only come down here to play games and also not like we watch our own msnbc. you know, that's just for athletes. you know, we're part of this world, too, and when you have more and more athletes who have connections to the lbgt community and a mo
. >> and so the killing just continues on the ground indefinitely, right? >> alas, and do we send in the marines or whatever we send in or we bomb them. >> and we get in the middle of a civil war and, of course, ends badly. and the region erupts. the russians. it seems to me that it's not in the russians' best interests in the long run to continue standing beside a tyrant who seems to me, if the past is prologue, cannot survive this in the long run. >> i think you're right in terms of the interests. but there is a peculiar aspect, namely putin's personality and personal obsessions. this is a man driven by nostalgia and resentment. he literally hates the fact that the soviet empire collapsed. he wants to recreate it. and he may be calculating that if we get bogged down in iran and in the region, he'll have an opening to crack down on something very important to europe and to us, georgia and as asser b azerbaijan. >> talking about the president needing more engagement, getting into areas where he can have a real impact, what does that look like, do you think, in this second term? wh
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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